June 26, 2010

Employers May Be Held Liable for Sexual Harassment by Non-Employees

Most employers recognize that they can be held liable under Title VII for the actions of their employees; however, not all employers realize that they may also be held liable under Title VII for the sexually harassing acts of a non-employee.



Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires certain employers to provide employees with workplaces free from sexual discrimination and harassment.  Most employers recognize that they can be held liable under Title VII for the actions of their employees; however, not all employers realize that they may also be held liable under Title VII for the sexually harassing acts of a non-employee.

Under Title VII, if an employer knew or should have known about the harassing conduct of a non-employee and the employer failed to take immediate and appropriate corrective action, the employer may be found liable for the harassing actions of the non-employee.  For example, if an employee reports to her manager that a co-worker’s boyfriend routinely visits the workplace and makes offensive sexual comments to her, her employer could be held liable for the actions and comments of the co-worker’s boyfriend if it fails to remedy the situation and prevent future harassment.

For assistance in developing employment policies to address sexual harassment or to speak with a Dallas employment law attorney regarding workplace discrimination and harassment, contact the discrimination and harassment law attorneys at Clouse Dunn Khoshbin LLP at info@cdklawyers.com

 


Source: Story.KISSPR.com
Release ID: 8826